Mens Spring 2019

 

There seem to be two major trends happening on the menswear runways: 1. Activewear as sportswear 2. Womens inspired menswear. Neither of these are some big revelation as activewear has been encroaching on sportwear for a while now, but now it seems to have solidified its presence to where you can no longer find a sportswear collection that doesn’t include trainers and a puffy jacket… or 10. The colors are brighter, the fabrics are direct from the gym and the accessories are literal (duffel bags anyone?) Almost directly in contrast to this is the movement to bring womenswear for the men. We are seeing details as subtle as nipped in waists on jackets and as extreme as full on gowns with corsets. Women have been stealing from mens’ wardrobes since the 1920’s so why did it take so long for men to steal from them? In any case credit to the designers who can do it without looking lazy, as in, just put a boy in a dress. Those that borrow elements and use them thoughtfully have the most success in my opinion. Like Ann Demeulemeester, or Alexander McQueen – both who have made our very short list for favorites from the Mens Spring 2019 collections…

Tom Ford

I don’t think that Tom Ford’s reputation as a stylish MF has ever been up for debate. He can cut a suit that will stand out as the coolest, slickest, most expensive looking fellow in the room. By deftly using classic silhouettes and timeless fabrics he manages to make clothes that defy an era. They simultaneously subscribe to and transcend the 1950’s beetle era, the 1960’s jazz era, the 1970’s studio 54 era, the 80’s wall street – nineties mod, 2000’s hipster and on. Any of these suits would look just as sharp attending any of the parties in any of the hippest, most exclusive, most enviable homes in the hills of wherever, the penthouse of whatever. Timeless and of all times.

Yohji Yamamoto

It’s not often that I would describe menswear as beautiful. This collection by Yamamoto was just that. The clothes were fluid and thoughtfully draped to wear together.  The pieces with the screened florals were such a lovely contrast against the bleak darkness of the solid black. The pairing with leather and printed leather were just cool and had a bit of modern edge to an otherwise dreamy poetic collection.

Dries Van Noten

I absolutely always vibe with the colors used by Dries Van Noten. When I was obsessed with dusty colors against deep tones he validated me. (see it here on the old blog)

Currently I am obsessed with navy and deep greens against yellow and burnt orange, throw in some fuchsia and cherry red and now we’re talking! This collection goes a bit over wearable for mens though, in that the use of the bright color and the bold pattern can get a bit cartoonish – clownish even. I prefer seeing muted tones in the patterns and bright colors used as solids or as an accent.

Ann Demeulemeester

True to form Ann Demeulemeester has delivered another romantic collection for the modern day brooding poet. This time with a hint of beekeeper. The clothes as always are fluid and layered, gauzy and silky in an array of whites on black and minimal accent colors. This time a pale yellow and soft pink. The best bits are the pieced in satin stripe or lace details in the jackets making them unique and delightfully unisex. Lace for a man is particularly difficult to pull off but I don’t think anyone has come closer to doing it than here.  The lace sleeves still read as masculine on these jackets due to the broad cut and padding of the shoulder. Daresay sexy and not in a Prince wearing lace kind of overt way and more in a confident in his masculinity way. Nice

 

Alexander McQueen

OK this collection killed it. The mashup of a nerdy, straight-laced, dapper fellow with the edgy, tough guy and conceptual artist is brilliantly executed. Bringing together these personalities in one collection is an excellent representation of just what McQueen menswear is all about. There is always an element of punk, always a connection to nature and art through beauty and always the clothes are rooted by the bespoke nature of Saville row in London. It’s as if Burton has dissected these parts and shown them to us here, to say here are our split personalities because no-one is only one thing. It’s finding that balance of all our sides that makes us unique.

 

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Curated by Heather Koszyk View all posts by enexile

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